Alumni News

Anthony Lin '09, now a senior at Duke, receives NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship

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From the Duke University announcement

Lin is a native of Portland, Ore., and has been a key member of the Duke fencing team over his four years. A three-time NCAA qualifier, Lin posted a career record of 181-56 as a member of Duke’s saber squad. He served as team captain as a senior, helping the Duke men post a 15-9 overall record and the sabers a 16-8 mark.

Lin is a three-time member of the ACC Academic Honor Roll and appeared on the Capital One Academic All-District III Team in 2011-12. A double major in neuroscience and computer science, he currently owns a grade point average of 3.855 and will graduate from Duke in May.

The NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship was created in 1964 to promote and encourage postgraduate education by rewarding the Association's most accomplished student-athletes through their participation in NCAA championship and/or emerging sports. Athletics and academic achievements, as well as campus involvement, community service, volunteer activities and demonstrated leadership, are evaluated.

Freshman Anirudh Jain wins state Stockholm Junior Water Prize

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Congrats!

Anirudh was selected for the prize based on his science project “Sulfidation as a Novel Method for Reducing Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticle Pollution.”

The Stockholm Junior Water Prize is the world's most prestigious youth award for a water-related science project. The prize taps into the potential of today's high school students as they seek to address current and future water challenges. » Link to more information.

 

Tuition on the Track raises $65,000 – $15,000 over goal – for financial aid

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Letter of thanks from event organizers

Dear Catlin Gabel community members,

Thank you so much for your enthusiastic participation in Tuition on the Track. It was such a pleasure to see the entire community uniting to support financial aid. With your help we exceeded our goal of $50,000 and raised a whopping $65,000! We couldn’t have done this without our many sponsors and individual supporters — we really couldn’t be more grateful!

Having gone to Catlin Gabel for our entire lives, we have experienced firsthand the benefits of bringing together students from many different backgrounds. We are thrilled that the money raised will go to further this important school initiative.

» Link to more information on the history of this event

» Link to video and photo gallery of this year's event 

With great appreciation for your support,
Max Meyerhoff ’13 and Mira Hayward ’13, Tuition on the Track co-leaders

Update from head search chair Peter Steinberger

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Dear parents and guardians,  Upper School students, board members, and faculty-staff,

I’m writing to let you know that the head of school search committee and our search consultants, working in close collaboration, have now completed the school profile. This is the document that the consultants will use – indeed are using already – to introduce Catlin Gabel to prospective candidates. The profile has been posted on the school website, and we invite you to take a look at it. This document was the product of a great deal of careful thought. We feel it provides an honest and comprehensive picture of our school, and believe it will indeed be helpful in producing a terrific pool of applicants. We hope you agree.

The preliminary stages of the search have now been completed. To remind you of the steps so far:

• In various settings, the search committee engaged in lengthy and serious discussions about our ambitions for Catlin Gabel and for a new head of school.
• On the basis of an intensive and very competitive process, we selected outstanding search consultants.
• We solicited opinions and recommendations from the entire community regarding the search process and possible candidates.
• The consultants formally surveyed the community and also conducted a series of meetings on campus with a wide range of constituents.
• On the basis of all this information, we were able to develop a systematic view of community-wide opinion on a large variety of issues that resulted in, among other things, the profile.

The search is now entering what might be called its silent stage. For the next several months we will build the applicant pool. Our consultants will evaluate recommendations from any number of sources, both from within and outside the Catlin Gabel community, and will work with potential candidates to ascertain and, in many cases, encourage their interest. Much of this is, of course, behind-the-scenes work. It will be conducted largely in confidence, which is why there will be little if anything to report for several months. During the summer the search committee will identify and meet in person with a small number of especially promising candidates from which we hope to select our finalists. The plan is to bring finalists – perhaps three in number – to campus for interviews in mid to late September. At that point the silent phase will suddenly end. On-campus interviews will be public, and we intend to make them as inclusive as possible.

All of this means that – barring the unforeseen – you will next hear from me in late August or early September, at which time I will inform the entire community of the identities of our finalists and provide detailed information about the interview process itself. The search committee has worked together closely, very effectively, and, I must say, in a spirit of wonderful collegiality. We remain extremely optimistic and excited, and are already aware of a number of highly qualified people who are likely to become active and very strong candidates. On behalf of the committee, I can say that expressions of support and enthusiasm from the community have been most encouraging, and we greatly look forward to your participation in September as the final stages of the search unfold. In the meantime, and as always, thoughts, suggestions, recommendations, and the like will always be welcome and can be communicated to me at searchchair@catlin.edu.

Sincerely,
Peter Steinberger, trustee, parent of alumna, search committee chair

Search committee members

Dave Cannard, Jr. ’76, trustee (1997-07), board chair (2004-07), current parent, parent of alumnus, alumnus

Li-Ling Cheng, Middle School Mandarin teacher, parent of alumna

Clint Darling, interim head of school (1982-83), Upper School head (1973-86), retired Upper School English and French teacher, parent of alumnae

Isaac Enloe, kindergarten teacher

Aline Garcia-Rubio ’93, Upper School assistant head, dean of students, science teacher, current parent, alumna

John Gilleland, trustee, board chair (2009-12), current parent

Alix Meier Goodman ’71, trustee, endowment committee member, board chair (2007-10), parent of alumni, alumna

Vicki Roscoe, assistant head of school and Lower School head

Eric Rosenfeld ’83, vice-chair and treasurer board of trustees, current parent, alumnus

Miranda Wellman ’91, director of advancement, alumna

Jim Wysocki, Upper School math teacher and department chair

Congratulations to Pulitzer Prize winner Adam Johnson

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Adam Johnson has visited Catlin Gabel three times, twice as a visiting writer and once to deliver the commencement address. This photo was taken last spring in an English 11 class. During that visit, he gave a memorable reading from his novel The Orphan Master's Son at an Upper School assembly; this is the same novel that won the Pulitzer.

Tuition on the Track 2013 photo & video gallery

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Fundraiser for financial aid

Students and faculty-staff from every part of the school came down to the track on April 12 to walk, run, skip, and jump for the financial aid walkathon. This was year two for the student-run fundraiser. Bravo to Max and Mira for organizing and for arranging for dry weather. We raised $65,000!

Ron Sobel receives Model UN lifetime achievement award

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Bravo, Ron!

The Chris Allen Memorial Advisor’s Award was presented to Upper School Spanish teacher Ron Sobel at the closing ceremonies of the Oregon Model UN conference in Eugene. The award is given annually to an adult involved with MUN based on service to an individual club or the model as a whole. Ron has served as treasurer of the Oregon High School International Relations League and served as advisor to Catlin Gabel’s MUN program for many years. Every Catlin Gabel student participant at this year’s conference submitted a nominating letter in support of Ron. The letters spoke to Ron’s leadership, sense of humor, passion for cultivating a sense of global citizenship in youth, and the kind and loving way in which he has fostered relationships with his students and colleagues.

 

Sophomore Valerie Ding advances to International Science and Engineering Fair

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Valerie Ding took 1st place in physics and astronomy at the Regional Northwest Science Fair. Three other CG students competing at the regional competition placed 2nd in their categories: freshman Anirudh Jain in environmental management, freshman Lara Rakocevic in environmental analysis and effects, and senior Valerie Balog in cellular and molecular biology. Congratulations to all!

Alumna Erica Berry ’10, now a junior at Bowdoin College, named a 2013 Udall Scholar

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Erica is one of just 50 college sophomores and juniors selected from 488 candidates nominated by 230 colleges and universities. One of the criteria for students receiving the $5,000 Udall scholarship is a commitment to the environment.

Erica is an English and environmental studies major who strives to “write narrative nonfiction about the intersections between the ever-shifting environment and humanity.” The Udall Foundation is an independent federal agency.

 

Alumnus Yale Fan ’10, now a junior at Harvard, named one of the nation’s top undergrads in math, science, and engineering

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Yale is among 271 college sophomores and juniors, from a field of 1,107, selected for a Goldwater Scholarship. Faculties of colleges and universities nominate Goldwater Scholars. The one and two year scholarships will cover the cost of tuition, fees, books, and room and board up to a maximum of $7,500 per year. The Goldwater Foundation is a federally endowed agency that honors Senator Barry Goldwater and was designed to foster and encourage outstanding students to pursue careers in the fields of mathematics, the natural sciences, and engineering.

Yale is a physics and mathematics major. He plans to earn a PhD in theoretical high-energy physics.

Senior Perla Alvarez quoted on OPB radio news

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Perla co-chairs the Multnomah County Youth Commission

Listen to the 45-second sound clip

Fantastic Voyage auction raises $450,000

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Letter from Lark Palma, head of school

From first fold to flight, and at every stage in between, the Catlin Gabel experience is one Fantastic Voyage. Thanks to enthusiastic bidders, donors, supporters, volunteers, and staff, we set some records this year! The sold out event at Nike's Tiger Woods Center and the online auction raised $450,000.

Auction contributions make it possible for the school to provide a low student-teacher ratio, exceptional teachers, outstanding academic programs, and a strong commitment to financial aid. The funds we raise are essential for the school to thrive and enrich the student experience.

Thank you to the many, many wonderful people who spent countless hours preparing for the event during the last eight months. Special gratitude to fantastic co-chairs Karen Hoke and Kirsten Brady. Their vision, commitment, and creative direction guided the entire voyage.

»Enjoy the Fantastic Voyage video and photo gallery. The video is about Catlin Gabel alumna Qiddist Hammerly's voyage from the Beginning School through the Upper School and her successful launch from our nest to Northwestern University. 

Thank you for making this year one to remember!

With appreciation,
Lark Palma, head of school

 

Fantastic Voyage video and photos

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2013 auction at Nike World Headquarters

Guests at the 2013 auction were treated to this video featuring Catlin Gabel lifer Qiddist Hammerly '13, a student at Northwestern University. Following the video, Qiddist, her first grade buddy from last year, and her senior buddy from when she was a first grader took the stage. There was not a dry eye in the house!

Scroll down to see the photo gallery.

Thank you to our co-chairs Kirsten Brady and Karen Hoke.
 
Click on any image in the gallery below to enlarge it, download it, or start the slide show.

Focus on Philanthropy: A Love of Learning that Lasts a Lifetime

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 From the Winter 2012-13 Caller

John Chun ’87 & Elizabeth Baldwin ’89

John and Elizabeth married in 2003 and live in Seattle with their children, Naomi, 6, and Hugo, 4. John is a member of the Catlin Gabel alumni association board. 

Education

John: BA Columbia University; JD Cornell Law School
Elizabeth: BA Robert D. Clark Honors College, University of Oregon; MA Columbia University Teachers College; JD Seattle University School of Law

Profession

John: Trial lawyer and partner at Summit Law Group in Seattle. Practice areas include litigation, labor & employment, corporate, and environmental. I enjoy working with brilliant and funny colleagues and outstanding clients, being in court, and helping find solutions to complex problems. I’ve never had a boring day.
Elizabeth: Part-time lecturer at the UW School of Law, teaching legal research and writing to LL.M. students— international legal professionals, including lawyers, judges, magistrates, and academics. I love that I get to work closely with professionals from all over the world, and I have made particularly meaningful professional friendships with lawyers and academics in Afghanistan, and Indonesia and have learned from their global perspective.

How a Catlin Gabel education helped you succeed

John: Catlin Gabel worked wonders for my confidence. The substance of what I learned was important. But at least equally so was the process, in which hard work, creativity, and passion were encouraged. I felt like, “If I try really hard, I can figure this out. I can do this.” Much credit must go to my teachers, coaches, and schoolmates who helped me along the way.
Elizabeth: The writing instruction I received at Catlin Gabel, like Dave Corkran’s emphatic reminders to limit our papers to the call of “the question,” has been invaluable to my education and work. Small classes allow teachers to give students real feedback and concrete instruction on their writing, which continues to inform my approach to writing and teaching.

Favorite causes?

John: Catlin Gabel alumni association, board of Washington Low Income Housing Alliance, and a trustee of the King County Bar Association.
Elizabeth: Legal Voice works for women’s rights through legislation, self-help resources, and litigation; volunteer grant writing at our daughter’s language immersion public school, McDonald International.

Guiding principle?

John: I have many, including the Golden Rule. I also like what the Buffetts told their grandkids: show up, tell the truth, pay attention, do your best, and don’t be overly attached to outcome. Catlin Gabel emphasized hard work, integrity, and respect. And it strongly encouraged community service.
Elizabeth: Do what you know is right. Catlin Gabel helped me develop this sense of “right.” One of my favorite ideals that CG stressed is “Always leave a place cleaner than you found it.”

Why do you support Catlin Gabel?

John: Catlin Gabel had a huge impact on my life. My three siblings and I received an excellent education, and I cherish memories from the school. I believe deeply in Catlin Gabel and its mission.
Elizabeth: I was sad to hear about the passing of former head of school Manvel Schauffler. His commitment to financial aid will continue to inspire my own giving. People like Schauff had the vision to keep CG relevant to our community—to make sure that kids of all backgrounds would have the opportunity to benefit from its unique approach to educating the whole child. Financial aid is one of the main reasons that Catlin Gabel continues to be such a special place.

Catlin Gabel flourishes because alumni care to invest in it.

Support what you love.

Support the Catlin Gabel Fund. Make a contribution at www.catlin.edu.  

 

Alumni news

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 From the Winter 2012-13 Caller

Momentum from Alumni & Homecoming Weekend has continued through the fall and winter. The alumni association board’s four subcommittees are doing great work, thanks to 13 local members, 10 regional members, and 2 ex-officio staff members. We are grateful for their dedication and enthusiasm. We welcome your suggestions and feedback as we continue to do our best to keep Catlin Gabel alumni around the world connected to each other, our students and teachers, and former faculty-staff.
 
Service opportunities in Portland have bloomed. In early December, 27 alumni and 3 faculty members worked together to unload and sort more than 11,000 pounds of food at the Oregon Food Bank. In early March the alumni service committee hosted a productive morning of tree planting with Friends of Trees.
 
Events in New York, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Portland have connected us and provided opportunities for social and business networking. There are additional events planned for spring, so be sure to join us!
 
Recording school history moves forward. Community and alumni board members are rejuvenating the oral history program with motivation and excitement. Together we are also working toward a streamlined approach for maintaining the school archives long-term. Additional participants are welcome.
 
Distinguished alumni award recipients are honored in the fall, and the alumni board is currently accepting nominations. Please celebrate the accomplishments of our alumni by submitting an online nomination form: www.catlin.edu/alumni/alumni-awards. Deadline is April 15.
 
Alumni Weekend 2013 is set for September 27–28. We expect another fun-filled weekend celebrating reunions for classes ending in 3 and 8. If you are interested in helping plan your reunion, please contact Susie Greenebaum ’05.
 
Catlin Gabel flourishes because alumni care enough to invest in it. Alumni invest in our students and their alma mater through their expertise, time, and resources. Please keep in touch, visit campus, and get involved.
 

Alumni Association Board, Portland members

Front row L to R: Susie Greenebaum ’05, Debbie Ehrman Kaye ’73, Owen Gabbert ’02, Courtney Mersereau ’99, Bobby Bonaparte ’06. Back row L to R: Peter Bromka ’00, Len Carr ’75, Ashley Tibbs ’92, Molly Kitchel Honoré ’02, Sarah Lowenstein ’11, Lauren Dully ’91. Not pictured: Bill Crawford ’97, Katey Jessen Flack ’97, Drew Fletcher ’03, Duncan McDonnell ’99, David Reich ’80
 

Reunions: What the class of 1998 is reading!

Will Decherd: Bruce by Peter Carlin, an inspiring biography of Bruce Springsteen
Winslow Corbett: Cheryl Strayed’s outstanding memoir Wild
Brenden Schaefer: The Responsible Company by Yvon Chouinard & Vincent Stanley
Libby Kottkamp: Here if You Need Me by Kate Braestrup
Peter Chaillé: Under the Sea-Wind by Rachel Carson
Xan Young: Guns, Germs and Steel by Jared Diamond
James McDonald (beachside): Belize Lonely Planet
Andrew McCartor: Michael Lewis’s Home Game
Katie Sharff has given up reading to spend more time sleeping and taking care of her new baby boy.  
 
Lauren Dully '91, associate director of development
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Susie Greenebaum '05, alumni relations officer

 

The Rise of Online Teaching & Learning

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In what ways does it work best?

 From the Winter 2012-13 Caller

By Dan Griffiths

We adults tend to evaluate current classroom techniques through the lens of our own educational experience. None of us had access or exposure to the wide variety of technology that is commonplace in the 21st-century classroom, and attitudes toward educational innovation often tend to be conservative—if traditional teaching methods have been successfully educating our children for generations, why risk introducing distracting gadgets in place of “proper” teaching? Information technology also has its champions, who see the internet, social media, and ubiquitous access to the required hardware as tools that are capable of driving an educational revolution.
 
My feelings fall somewhere between these two extremes. In his book The Shallows Nicholas Carr cites TV and radio pioneer David Sarnoff: “We are too prone to make technological instruments the scapegoats for the sins of those who wield them. The products of modern science are not in themselves good or bad; it is the way they are used that determine their value.” This quote neatly encapsulates my thoughts about the role of technology and online learning in a 21st-century school. As a direct replacement for a classroom teacher, online learning is of limited value. But in the hands of a skilled educator, it is an incredible tool that can enhance the educational experience of our students.
 
One of the major concerns about online learning is the absence of interpersonal relationships that are crucial in both social and intellectual development. This fear arises from a vision of children downloading information into their brain and then demonstrating via some kind of automated test that this information has been saved on their mental “hard drive.” In this model, the computer is merely a substitute for a lecture-style class with a standardized test at the end of the course (which is a model that we accepted for many years both in schools and colleges, but when put in these terms it sounds sinister). This concern was more valid in the early years of online learning due to limitations in both software and hardware. With the advent of social media, Voicethread and Skype for example, it is much easier to develop a course that requires interaction between both student and teacher and groups of students. Online courses that are thoughtfully developed by skilled teachers are no longer a lonely pursuit of factual knowledge.
 
The central role of the teacher in an effective online course cannot be overstated. In his review of the integration of learning theories and technology, Norbert Pachler identified the need for teachers to “identify appropriate learning outcomes, choosing appropriate software and activities and structuring and sequencing the learning process.” To see online classes as simply a new way to deliver information limits its potential to just another transmission model of education, where the student is an empty vessel to be filled with information. If the full potential of online learning is met, it can be a highly progressive teaching method in which each student can have an individualized, discovery-based experience consisting of a wide variety of interactions with students and teachers from different backgrounds. Such an online experience can develop essential skills such as creativity, critical thinking, and collaboration as effectively as any physical classroom, arguably in a way more easily translated to the world outside academia.
 
Online learning is not a new concept, particularly in higher education. Providers such as the University of Phoenix have been operating an online program since 1989, and more recently the University of Texas launched an online and blended learning school, Western Governors University. Both of these seek to make education in high-demand fields more accessible and affordable to working adults. Many colleges now give access to their courses in a variety of formats such as podcast series and videos of lectures with accompanying course notes that allow public access to educational content. Massive open online courses (MOOCs), with offerings from providers such as Coursera, EdX, and Udacity (with content provided by professors at colleges such as Stanford, Princeton, MIT, and the University of Pennsylvania) attract millions of users from hundreds of countries. The completion rate of their courses, however, is reported to be less than 10 percent. These MOOCs were founded with the noble goal of providing access to high-level education for all, with the only limitation being access to a computer and an internet connection. Peer reviews and assessments, discussion boards for posting questions, and enrollment in global study groups provide the social element of learning.
 
One of the most interesting outcomes of these courses is that they are challenging how we assess learning and raise questions about how we measure success. Critics point to the ease with which students can plagiarize and cheat on assessments, but for now the age-old adage of “you are only cheating yourself” holds true because completion of the course comes with a certificate that has limited currency in terms of gaining qualifications from established schools or an advantage in the job market. The stakes, however, will be raised if and when MOOCs gain credibility with employers and possibly even qualify for academic credit (the University of Washington is now giving credit for a Coursera course).
 
Most early online-only courses were aimed at students in higher education, but information technology has been integrated into the classroom since the turn of the century. Virtual learning environments (VLEs) have been widely used in schools, often making use of learning management systems such as Moodle and Haiku. They give students access to course notes, quizzes, and other resources and allow interactivity through discussion forums and wikis. As these platforms mature, they are becoming more intuitive and can take advantage of an increasing number of multimedia applications.
 
Catlin Gabel has been at the forefront of digital innovation in schools, adopting a one-to-one laptop program in the Upper School in 2002. Many courses use Moodle as a content management system, student and faculty laptops come preloaded with a wide variety of software, and our classrooms are well equipped with IT hardware. In 2011 Catlin Gabel was a founding member of a consortium of highly academic independent schools that formed the Global Online Academy (GOA).
 
Faculty from member schools teach all online GOA classes. A rigorous selection process requires applicant teachers to show that their class will be innovative and well structured, and will take full advantage of the tools made uniquely available by both an online environment and access to a diverse group of students. The classes are designed for collaboration, with a blend of individual and group assignments. Students are required to have regular Skype conversations with their teacher, and the workload is equivalent to a full class in a bricks-and-mortar school. GOA classes follow an asynchronous schedule, which means the students work in their own time and set up virtual meetings with teachers and classmates at mutually convenient times. GOA has plans to expand in number and geographical diversity over the next six years from its current 24 member schools in the U.S., Japan, China, Jordan, and Indonesia.
 
In the GOA’s first year, Catlin Gabel teacher George Zaninovich taught an urban studies class, and four CG students enrolled in a variety of classes. This year, three Catlin Gabel teachers offer GOA classes, and 19 students are enrolled in classes such as Medical Problem Solving, Bioethics, and Global Health.
 
The many benefits GOA offers our students include the ability to interact with students and teachers who bring a wide variety of perspectives to the class. For example, George’s urban studies class had students researching and discussing community issues in Jordan and in New York, Chicago, Detroit, and Honolulu. It also allows them to take classes Catlin Gabel can’t offer due to staffing and scheduling limitations. Students enrolled in online classes are challenged in different ways than in a physical classroom. They need to learn efficient time management skills and take ownership of their learning in a more explicit way than at their home school (a skill that will be invaluable in college). Finally, asynchronous online classes allow those involved with activities such as high-level athletics, dance, or drama to balance classes with the time demands of training or rehearsal schedules that clash with the traditional school day.
 
Teachers also benefit from involvement with online education. In preparation for teaching her Hispanic Experience class for the GOA, Lauren Reggero-Toledano attended a weeklong workshop that she considers the best professional development experience of her career. She came back brimming with ideas not only for her online class but for her current Spanish courses at Catlin Gabel. Teachers who think about how to teach a class online must also reexamine how they teach in general. It exposes teachers to a whole other set of tools with which to engage their students.
 
The Global Online Academy is just one example of how online learning can enhance the educational experience of our students. “Flipping” the classroom, another idea, is receiving a great deal of attention, and this teaching technique certainly has its merits. The basic concept is that students read or listen to lectures and presentations at home, either prepared by the teacher or from online services such as the Khan Academy. Their time with the teacher is then spent discussing and analyzing what they learned. When reading about such innovations, I am always struck by how familiar they sound. Classes in the Upper School regularly involve students reading and researching, then presenting and discussing in a student-centered classroom environment. The chalk-and-talk delivery model of teaching is discouraged, and student engagement is a central theme in our classrooms, be it in a problem-based math class or a senior English elective where students often take the lead in teaching. The flipped classroom helps public schools with large classes by allowing students to control the pace of content delivery. It is a less novel concept at Catlin Gabel, where small class sizes, differentiated curricula, and availability of teachers to meet with students individually are commonplace.
 
Although information technology can be a highly effective tool in the hands of skilled educators and has the potential to enhance the experience of students at all levels, it is not a panacea for our educational challenges. Any ill-conceived and poorly executed use of technology in any field will lead to poor results—and online learning is no exception. When the Catlin Gabel faculty and staff discussed joining the GOA, some felt that “if we don’t get on this train, we will be left behind.” We can extend this metaphor by saying that it is foolish to get on a train that might be going somewhere you don’t want to go. I am confident, however, that in this case we are going in the right direction, and the journey will be an exciting one. My hope is that in the next few years all students at Catlin Gabel will take advantage of the opportunity to sample an online class, and that our faculty will blend the best of online learning with the exemplary methods already used in our physical classrooms.
 
Dan Griffiths, Upper School head, has been at CG since 2007. He holds an MA in biological sciences from the University of Oxford and a PhD in zoology from the University of Cambridge. He was formerly the IT director at St. Columba’s College in Ireland.   

REFERENCES AND CITATIONS

Carr, Nicholas. The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2010.
 
Lewin, Tamar. "One Course, 150,000 Students." New York Times online article. July 8, 2012. Accessed January 2013.
 
Long, Katherine. “UW to offer fee-based courses through Coursera.” Seattle Times online article. Accessed January 2013.
 
Pachler, Norbert. “Theories of Learning and ICT.” In Leask, Marilyn & Norbert Pachler, editors: Learning to Teach Using ICT in the Secondary School: A Companion to School Experience. London: Routledge, 1999.
 
Pereira. Eva. "Coursera: Opening Ivy League Universities to the Masses." Forbes online article. June 28, 2012. Accessed January 2013.
 
Sloan Consortium. Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States. Online survey report. Accessed January 2013.
 
Wukman, Alex. "Coursera Battered with Accusations of Plagiarism and High Drop-Out Rates." Online Colleges online article. August 22, 2012. Accessed January 2013.